Awanui tower

Laying the foundations of the Kaitaia-Awanui wireless station, North Auckland: driving the last pile on the tower site

“Laying the foundations of the Kaitaia-Awanui wireless station, North Auckland: driving the last pile on the tower site.” A Northwood, Auckland Weekly News, 4 Apr 1912. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19120509-7-2

Foundation for the tower at Awanui wireless station

Foundation for the tower at Awanui wireless station. Photo: A Northwood, Awanui Scrapbook, Te Ahu Museum

The new wireless station in the Far North: the tower under construction at Kaitaia

“The new wireless station in the Far North: the tower under construction at Kaitaia.” A Northwood Auckland Weekly News, 6 Jun 1912. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19120606-16-7

Riggers at work (or having fun?) as the Awanui tower reaches 130 feet

Riggers at work (or having fun?) as the Awanui tower reaches 130 feet. Photo: A Northwood, Awanui Scrapbook, Te Ahu Museum

The progress of the North Auckland wireless station: the mast at Kaitaia carried to a height of 200 feet

“The progress of the North Auckland wireless station: the mast at Kaitaia carried to a height of 200 feet.” A Northwood, Auckland Weekly News, 25 Jul 1912. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19120725-6-5

One of three "20-ton" concrete  anchor blacks for the Awanui tower guys.

One of three “20-ton” concrete anchor blacks for the Awanui tower guys. Courtesy: Te Ahu Museum

The Awanui wireless tower reaches 300 feet in 1912

The Awanui wireless tower reaches 300 feet in 1912. Photo courtesy Te Ahu Museum

The North Auckland high-power wireless station: the steel mast reaches its full height of 400 feet

“The North Auckland high-power wireless station: the steel mast reaches its full height of 400 feet.” A Northwood, Auckland Weekly News, 26 Sep 1912. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19120926-2-2

The mast weighed 60 tons (the weight is often quoted as 120 tons, which presumably includes the weight of rigging, the aerial and the downward tension they exert). The bottom of the tower came to a point and was ball-shaped so that it could pivot in a steel cup on top of a stack of glass insulators.

Completing the mast of the Kaitaia wireless station: sending up the last section

“Completing the mast of the Kaitaia wireless station: sending up the last section.” A Northwood, Auckland Weekly News, 26 Sep 1912. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19120926-2-3

It appears workers are jacking up the tower in order to remove the timbers, on which the tower was built, before lowering the tower onto its glass insulators. The sign appears to read: "Viewers (Visitors?) are not allowed on the tower. By order".

It appears workers are jacking up the tower in order to remove the timbers, on which the tower was built, before lowering the tower onto its glass insulators. The sign reads: “Visitors are not allowed on the tower. By order”. Photo: Awanui Scrapbook, Te Ahu Museum

The completed tower standing on its pivot ball and glass insulators. L-R: Jas Twiss, Norm Furness, Eugene Reinhard (Telefunken Engineer)

The completed tower standing on its pivot ball and glass insulators. L-R: Jas Twiss, Norm Furness, Eugene Reinhard (Telefunken Engineer). Photo: Awanui Scrapbook, Te Ahu Museum

Jas Twiss, Norm Furness, Eugene Reinhard at the base of the Awanui wireless station tower in 1913.

Closeup of the above photo. L-R: Jas Twiss, Norm Furness, Eugene Reinhard at the base of the Awanui wireless station tower in 1913.

One of three anchor blocks for the tower at Awanui wireless station. There were two sets of three solid steel guys: one attached to the tower at the 150ft level of the tower, and the other at 300ft. The top 100ft of the tower was self-supporting.

One of three anchor blocks for the tower at Awanui wireless station. There were two sets of three solid steel guys: one attached to the tower at the 150ft level of the tower, and the other at 300ft. The top 100ft of the tower was self-supporting. Photo: Awanui Scrapbook, Te Ahu Museum