Papeete Radio (Tahiti)

1912

On 25 January it was reported in New Zealand that “the first wireless station in the South Sea Islands” was on the air, which suggests that it could have begun operation the previous year.

The first wireless telegraph station in the South Sea Islands: the operator at Papeete, Tahiti, receiving a message.
The first wireless telegraph station in the South Sea Islands: the operator at Papeete, Tahiti, receiving a message. Auckland Weekly News, 25 Jan 1912, p14

1915

A radio station erected by the French Government at Haapape, or Mahina, near Venus Point, on the island of Tahiti, was declared open to receive and transmit commercial messages on 28 December. It is not clear whether this is the same station that was pictured in operation in 1911 or 1912.

1917

…’time’ was transmitted on one evening from the Observatory clock, Wellington, to Tahiti. The clock was arranged to make contacts at intervals of a minute and worked a relay at Awanui over a land-line about 600 miles long, the relay in turn operating a sounder which served as a key to work the high-power transmitting apparatus. Ten separate signals which were sent were reported as having been received in an entirely satisfactory manner at Tahiti, the distance covered being 2245 nauts.
– Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives: Post & Telegraph Department, 1917

1924

A system of broadcasting meteorological forecasts and hurricane warnings throughout the Southern Pacific has been developed during the year by the Naval Department, and is now in operation. Radio-Apia receives meteorological reports daily from Tonga, Tahiti, Rarotonga, Fiji, Norfolk Island, New Hebrides, and New Zealand. These reports are correlated with the observations made at the Apia Observatory, and a forecast is broadcasted [sic] twice daily during the hurricane season, and once daily during the non-hurricane season.
– Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives: Post & Telegraph Department, 1924