Himatangi 1980-1993

Entrance to Himatangi Radio. Date unknown

Entrance to Himatangi Radio in the early 1980s. Photo: Alan Turner

Northeastern view of the 15,000 sq ft Himatangi Radio building c1980

Northeastern view of the 15,000 sq ft Himatangi Radio building c1980

The Drive Room at Himatangi Radio housed frequency sources and drive units that generated baseband signals to feed the transmitters. Most of this equipment used valves; the older heterodyne synthesisers used germanium transistors.

Drive Room at Himatangi Radio, added in 1966, housed frequency sources and drive units that generated baseband signals to feed the transmitters. Most of this equipment used valves; the older heterodyne synthesisers used germanium transistors. Early 1980s. Photo courtesy: Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

By the late 1980s an additional rack of Harris Exciter units had been installed and the Racal receiver was repositioned. Don Nichol is shown at the receiver, c1980s

By the late 1980s an additional rack of Harris Exciter units had been installed in the Drive Room and the Racal receiver was repositioned. Don Nichol is shown at the receiver, c1980s. Photo courtesy Jon Asmus. Click to enlarge.

Transmitter hall at Himatangi Radio. Photo taken from the gantry used to change fluorescent ceiling lights.

Transmitter hall at Himatangi Radio. Photo taken from the gantry used to change fluorescent ceiling lights. Back left: Met CW transmitters. Back right: Marconi HS51. Forward from HS51: Redifon transmitters 136 and 137, then the three DS12s 1052, 1023 and 1457. Control console and antenna switch console (back) in the centre. Early 1980s. Courtesy Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

Maritime SSB transmitters: two Harris 15kW PEP (118 and 068) and two Collins 10kW PEP (732 and 942).

Maritime SSB transmitters: two Harris 15kW PEP (118 and 068) and two Collins 10kW PEP (732 and 942). Early 1980s. Photo: Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

STC 40kW PEP transmitter (1022) used for Scott Base communications.

STC 40kW PEP transmitter 1022, used for Scott Base communications. The PA valves were a pair of water-cooled CV446s. Early 1980s. Photo: Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

Technician Don Nichol with STC transmitter 1022, c1980

Technician Don Nichol with STC transmitter 1022 (used for communication with Scott Base, Antarctica), c1980. Photo: Jon Asmus

Inside view of transmitter 1022 showing the filter capacitor bank. Note the earth stick on the HT line.

Inside view of STC transmitter 1022 showing the filter capacitor bank. Note the earth stick on the HT line. Early 1980s. Photo: Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

RCA transmitter (945) of about 4kW CW. Used four 833 valves in a parallel push-pull configuration.

RCA transmitter (945) of about 4kW CW. Used four 833 valves in a parallel push-pull configuration. Early 1980s. Photo: Alan Turner. Click to enlarge.

Frequencies used in the 1980s (If you can add to this list, please contact us.)

Weather broadcasts:
5915 kHz 1
7600 kHz (ZLZ22) “Wellington/Himatangi – Facsimile 120 scans/min” 2
11,130 kHz (ZLX22) “Wellington/Himatangi – Facsimile” 2
14,850 kHz (ZLX37) “Wellington/Himatangi – Facsimile” 2
19,488 kHz (ZLX31) “Wellington/Himatangi – Facsimile 120 scans/min” 2

Also:
18,710 kHz USB (ZLX41)3

Himatangi Radio transmitter log, 11 May 1981. Click to enlarge.

Himatangi Radio transmitter log, 11 May 1981. Click to enlarge.

Himatangi Radio QSL card, probably from the 1980s

Himatangi Radio QSL card, probably from the 1980s. Photo: utilityradio.com. Click to enlarge.

1 Source: NOAA – Worldwide Marine Weather Broadcast Stations, July 1977
2 Source: Monitoring Times – May 1984
3 Source: 1989 QSL card from ZLW

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